Our Contributors - Fall 2013

Randy Donowitz has been keeping aquariums most of his life. During the mid 1980s and 90s he was consumed with the breeding of African Cichlids. In 1994 he purchased his first marine system- a simple 55 gallon reef setup and he has been an incurable coralholic ever since. Randy's articles have appeared in numerous hobbyist publications including Aquarium Frontiers, Advanced Aquarist, Marine Fish and Reef USA Annual and Aquarium Fish magazine. Currently, he curates and maintains the 3 system, 700 gallon coral reef display at Pratt Institute in Brooklyn, NY where he enjoys the privilege of sharing his knowledge and love of the hobby with students, staff, and community members from around the Tri-State area.
Brian Cook is an artist and graphic designer from South Florida, presently living in New York City. He is pursuing his graduate degree in the History of Art at Hunter College and is currently employed in the Writing and Tutorial Center at the Pratt Institute. In March of 2014, he finally started up his first 20 gallon reef tank, learning much from many of the best hobbyists in the country.
Sanjay Joshi in real life is a Professor of Industrial and Manufacturing Engineering at Penn State University. He has been a reef addict since 1992, and currently keeps several reef aquariums at home including a 500G SPS coral dominated reef. He also co-manages the 500G aquarium at Penn State. He has published several articles in magazines such as Marine Fish and Reef Annual, Aquarium Frontiers, Aquarium Fish, and Advanced Aquarist. In addition, he has been an invited speaker at several marine aquarium society meetings in the US and Europe. He received the MASNA award in 2006, for his contributions to the marine aquarium hobby.
Tim Wijgerde Obtained his Bachelor's and Master's degrees from the University of Utrecht (The Netherlands) in 2007, after which he became involved in coral research at Wageningen UR (The Netherlands). At present, he is completing his dissertation at Wageningen UR, which focuses on the role of heterotrophy in the growth and physiology of the scleractinian coral Galaxea fascicularis. He is also involved in a research project (FORCE, www.force-project.eu) which addresses the effects of climate change and pollution on coral growth and survival. The project uses the Caribbean coral Porites porites to investigate the interactive effects of acidification and eutrophication. Recently, Tim has set up the first experimental coral nursery in The Netherlands together with EcoDeco BV. This project was funded by the Dutch Ministry of Economic Affairs, Agriculture and Innovation. See www.ecocoral.eu for more information.
Richard Aspinall has worked in the conservation field for over two decades and has been photographing the underwater world since he learnt to dive seven years ago. Richard is now a freelance writer and photographer and works for a number of magazines. Richard is also the editor of UltraMarine Magazine, the UK’s premier magazine for marine aquarists . Richard also shoots the world above the water line and runs another photography and journalism business: Aspinallink along with his wife Angela, he is based in Yorkshire, England. See more at: www.triggerfishphotography.com www.aspinallink.co.uk
James Fatherree is a science instructor at Hillsborough Community College in Tampa. He has been keeping marine aquariums for 20 years, and has spent many days diving in Florida, the Bahamas, Hawaii, Japan, and Indonesia, too. In the past, he also managed an aquarium store, owned and operated an aquarium installation and maintenance business, and worked for an aquarium livestock collector/wholesaler in Florida. James has also published over 250 articles in various aquarium magazines in the U.S. and Europe, and has written and illustrated several books on the topics of reef organisms and marine aquariums, the latest of which is Giant Clams in the Sea and the Aquarium. For more about the author, visit his homepage at www.fatherree.com/james, or look him up on Facebook.
Rich Ross is a Senior Biologist at the Steinhart Aquarium in the California Academy of Sciences where he cultures and cares for exotic cephalopods, fish & coral, participates in ongoing field work on coral spawning, animal collection & transport, and manages tropical saltwater displays including the 212,000 Philippine Coral Reef exhibit. He is a prolific writer and dynamic speaker, authoring academic papers and a catalogue of articles on aquarium and reef related educational topics including his Skeptical Reefkeeping series which focuses on critical thinking, responsibility and ethics of aquarium keeping. His work has been covered by mainstream media outlets including Scientific American, National Geographic, Penn’s Sunday School and Fox News. Richard has kept saltwater animals for over 25 years, and has worked in aquarium maintenance, retail, wholesale and has consulted for a coral farm/fish collecting station in the South Pacific. Before working in the animal world was a professional Juggler and corporate presentation script writer. He is an avid underwater photographer/videographer and has been fortunate to scuba dive many of the worlds reefs. At home he cares for a 300 gallon reef system and a 250 gallon cephalopod/fish breeding system, a hairless dog, 2 hairless cats, 2 geckos and 6 chickens. When not doing all that stuff, he enjoys glass blowing, juggling, horseback riding, mixed martial arts, exercising his philosophy degree, spending time with his fabulous daughter and his incredibly generous, intelligent, gorgeous and patient wife.
Drew Wham has been active in many areas of the aquarium hobby including breeding dwarf cichlids, keeping freshwater-planted tanks and saltwater fish-only tanks. In 2001, he was introduced to reef aquariums while working at Tideline Aquatics in Charleston, SC and almost immediately constructed a 46-gallon reef of his own. He has been hooked on corals ever since. Currently, he is working on a PhD in Marine Molecular Genetics in the LaJeunesse Lab at Penn State. Drew has a BS in Biology and an MSc in Marine Biology from the College of Charleston in SC. His research focuses on using newly developed genetic methods to delineate populations and species of corals and their symbionts. His PhD thesis describes the Symbiodinium species associated with many of the most common corals in the Indo-Pacific. He has collected coral genetic samples in the Red Sea and Japan and is planning a trip to Palau this summer.
Kenneth Wingerter contentedly resides in Connecticut, where he works as an aquarist for a leading aquarium services company. He studied in the Pacific Northwest, where he obtained a bachelor of science degree in Biology at the University of Oregon, as well as a certificate of completion in the Oregon Coast Community College Aquarium Science Program. His diverse interests in aquatic biology have led to projects ranging from tropical freshwater paludaria to temperate marine aquaria, and work ranging from wholesale aquarium fish sales to laboratory aquaculture.
Paul Whitby is originally from the UK, but now resides in Oklahoma USA. While in the UK, he received his Doctorate in the microbiology of fish diseases, specifically diseases of fish with high economic importance and has published several articles in this field as well as medical microbiology. Currently he is an Associate Professor at the University of Oklahoma where he specializes in the microbiology of pediatric infectious diseases. Paul is the current President of the Central Oklahoma Marine Aquarium Society (COMAS) and has had several articles published in Reef Keeping online magazine and ReefBuilders. He has published several articles on COMAS, the development of a captive propagation program to conserve coral species, pests and parasites in marine aquaria as well as numerous reviews. In October 2007 his SPS dominated display tank was selected as Reef Keeping Magazine's Tank of the Month. Paul has presented several marine aquarium related seminars at local clubs and conferences including Oklahoma's CRASE, Reef Fest, ReefStock, NERAC, IMAC west and others. He has been keeping saltwater aquariums for over 22 years and has owned a variety of tanks ranging from under 30 to in excess of 600 gallons. His current system, including filtration, is over 1,000 gallons.
Josh Saul is a consultant for Fortune 500 finance and banking companies. He has been involved in the aquarium hobby for 15 years and has been SCUBA diving for over 20. He spends his spare time planning dive trips, designing websites, DJing, and finding new and exciting ways to flood his apartment.